TREE IDENTIFICATION

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Lovelandtreecare is ready to fulfil your contracting needs. Whether you’re looking for a few helpful tips or need an experienced professional to fully manage a project — we’ve got the tools and experience to guarantee success. Browse through Ou tree id section for any information you might to know about some of the most common trees.

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ALDER TREE

It’s All in the Details

 

Alder Trees

For all you need to know about the alder tree, including tips on how to identify it and typical characteristics; how to spot common diseases and pests and the best way to take care of an alder tree, read on.

The alder tree is a conical shaped, UK-native deciduous tree. Also known as common alder, black alder and European alder and of the Latin Alnus glutinosa, this tree is known to grow to heights of 25 metres on average and can live for 60 years.

Alder is connected to Franka alni, a bacteria that grows in the roots of the tree. This is a vital symbiotic relationship; the bacteria absorb nitrogen from the air and helps the tree absorb it. The tree in return feeds the bacteria with sugars. The soil around the tree is enhanced as a result, with all the surrounding plants enjoying an abundance of nitrogen.

DOGWOOD TREE

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Dogwood Trees

Dogwood is a very attractive plant. Read on to discover how to identify dogwood; what the most common diseases and pests are and the best way to prune and care for your dogwood tree.

Dogwood is a small, deciduous broadleaf shrub. Its bushy appearance makes it popular as a hedgerow and woodland edge plant. It is common in the south of England where it is widely used as an ornamental tree informal gardens. In autumn, dogwood is particularly attractive.

Cornus sanguinea as it is known scientifically is notable for its diversely coloured twigs. When the sun shines the twigs are crimson, whilst in the shade, they appear a lime green shade.

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OAK TREE

It’s All in the Details

Oak Tree

Everything you need to know about the mighty English oak tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; a step by step lifespan; how to prevent disease and the best methods of oak tree care.  The mighty English oak is feasibly the best known and most admired British native tree. It is certainly the most common tree species in the United Kingdom, particularly across the central and southern deciduous woodlands.

WILD CHERRY TREE

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Wild Cherry Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the wild cherry tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; wild cherry mythology and value to the environment; how to identify the disease and the best methods of cherry tree care.

There are many types of cherry tree; all of them part of the same family that produces peaches, plums and apricots. Some cherry trees are native to the UK, others are not so but nonetheless prevalent in this country. Here we are looking specifically at the wild cherry, a UK native species.

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ASH TREE

It’s All in the Details

 

Ash Tree

Everything you need to know about the ash tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; a step by step lifespan; how to prevent disease and the best methods of ash tree care.

The ash tree is a native UK species of tree that is often used for ornamental bordering thanks to its tendency to grow in groups, and its attractive leaves and highly elegant, graceful appearance. It is Britain’s third most common tree and pretty much dominates UK woodland.

YEW TREE

It’s All in the Details

Yew Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the yew tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a yew tree.

The yew tree is a UK-native evergreen conifer, well known for living to a grand age of 400 to 600 years. It is believed and stated by the Woodland Trust that there are ten yew trees in Britain that predate the 10th century, so this is a tree with exceptional history and one we should be proud of as a nation.

There are various types of the yew tree, including the Irish yew, English yew and numerous common yews including Icicle and Standishii which vary greatly in appearance, height and overall size from half a metre up to 20 metres. It is a popular tree for hedge forming as it provides year-round privacy screening and its red berry-like fruits are very eye-catching.

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WEEPING WILLOW TREE

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Weeping Willow Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the weeping willow tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a willow tree.

There are around 400 species of the willow tree, known in Latin as Salix meaning ‘sallow’. Generally, when you hear mention of a willow tree, you tend to naturally think of the ‘weeping willow’, or Salix babylonica. The long, elegant trailing branches that are characteristic to the weeping willow tree swish gracefully in the breeze, providing a much welcome haven for shade-seekers and wildlife alike.

The weeping willow is an extremely fast-growing tree that has a long history in Great Britain and, despite it having originated in China, is now very prevalent nationwide. It is one of the UK’s largest weeping trees and the sight of a weeping willow looming magnificently over a glistening lake has become quintessentially English.

CEDAR TREE

It’s All in the Details

Everything you need to know about the cedar tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a cedar tree.
The cedar tree is common in the UK, although it is actually native to Lebanon and is, in fact, the country’s national emblem. It is also found in parts of Asia and the eastern Mediterranean. It is an evergreen conifer forming part of the pine family and interestingly, its wood provides protection from insects where the tree grows as a native species.
Considered a popular and eye-catching architectural tree due to its striking appearance, the cedar tree’s low maintenance and the next-to-no requirement for pruning make it a top choice for public grounds landscapers and you will often see cedar trees in estate gardens and parks.
Some scientists recognise two varieties of the cedar of Lebanon, one being the Lebanon variety and the other the Turkish cedar. The tree also has two very close relations, the Cyprus cedar and the Atlas cedar.

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EUCALYPTUS TREE

It’s All in the Details

Eucalyptus Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the eucalyptus tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a eucalyptus tree.

The highly aromatic and fast-growing eucalyptus tree is native to Australia and only around 12 of its numerous species grow in Europe’s warmer regions. Also known as the gum tree due to the red coloured resin that oozes from the bark, the eucalyptus tree will vary quite substantially in appearance, from a short bushy shrub through to a tall evergreen tree up to around 30 metres in height.

Eucalyptus is part of the very large Myrtaceae otherwise known as ‘myrtle’ of which the bay rum tree, guava, clove and allspice also belong. Only the hardiest variations of the species do well in Britain due to its preference for a warmer climate.

The cider gum tree (Eucalyptus gunnii) is found in abundance on the Essex coast, and the Tasmanian blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) is in prevalent in Cornwall and Ireland.

BEECH TREE

It’s All in the Details

Beech Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the beech tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a beech tree.

The beech tree is a UK native species that are known to live for hundreds of years, sometimes even thousands with regular coppicing.

Beech trees have the potential to grow to over 40 metres in height and when mature typically develop a significantly sized domed crown. The beech is often confused with the hornbeam, although you can identify the beech by its characteristic wavy-edged leaves as opposed to the hornbeam that has leaves bearing serrated margins.

Due to its longevity, the beech tree is important for wildlife and it also makes an excellent hedging plant: give it a careful, regular clipping and it will retain its leaves, so providing year-round privacy for both householders and birdlife.

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SILVER BIRCH TREE

It’s All in the Details

Silver Birch Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the silver birch tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a silver birch tree.

The silver birch tree is native to the UK. It can reach 30 metres in height in maturity and has a light canopy with characteristic cascading branches. This tree is widely used to boost soil quality so that other plants can grow healthily and it does this courtesy of it deep roots that draw in otherwise inaccessible nutrients, recycling them into the soil as the leaves are shed.

HORNBEAM TREE

It’s All in the Details

Hornbeam Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the hornbeam tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a hornbeam tree.

The hornbeam tree is a deciduous broadleaf tree that is native to southern areas of the United Kingdom, although you will find it planted across the country. Only two species of Hornbeam are prevalent in Europe, and the tree is commonly mistaken for the beech. The name is derived from the hardness of the timber, with ‘horn’ meaning hard, and ‘beam’ being the old English name for a tree. A mature hornbeam tree can grow up to 30 metres in height and live over 300 years, especially with regular pollarding or coppicing.

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SYCAMORE TREE

It’s All in the Details

Sycamore Tree

 

Everything you need to know about the sycamore tree, from identification tips to typical characteristics; how to spot disease and the best way to maintain a sycamore tree.

The sycamore tree is part of the maple family. It is a large, broadleaf deciduous tree which is native to central, eastern and southern Europe. Now prevalent in the UK, its presence here is reckoned to date back to the Middle Ages. It’s a naturalised species here now and it’s the fact it has become such a popular species is down to the way its winged seeds spread and reseed with great ease.

The canopy of the sycamore tree is one of its redeeming features, and it is one of the most popular trees in parks and gardens for those seeking shade from the sun. The tree will grow anything up to 35 metres in height and has a long lifespan of over 400 years.

Sometimes confused with the field maple tree, the sycamore has a more angular winged seed. Its Latin name, Acer pseudoplatanus, means ‘like a plane tree’.

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